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journal:spring2020:chorton8:week9 [2020/03/25 22:53]
chorton8 Final post
journal:spring2020:chorton8:week9 [2020/03/25 22:53] (current)
chorton8 This isn't markdown heck
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 ====MARCH 25, 2020==== ====MARCH 25, 2020====
  
-Tutoring +===Tutoring===
-===+
 I've been helping Conor Goodwin recently, trying to get him up to speed. I honestly don't mind it since I have 6 years of programming experience, and I'm happy to share that knowledge. I got impatient trying to work with him on spf0 today, and I figured out why we've been having issues. Turns out, Structured and Object Oriented Problem Solving (CSCS1240) isn't as up to speed as expected. Joe is doing a good job teaching them, and they should have a good understanding of OOP concepts by the end of the semester. The problem is though, that Conor needs to have that knowledge now. By the end of the semester, he would have everything he needs, but right now it's absolutely hurting him to not have that knowledge. It would be nice if I didn't have to teach about arrays and for loops, which should be (and eventually will be this semester) taught in CSCS1240. I will communicate my concerns with the appropriate staff at some point, but this is my initial thoughts/​complaints that relate to the class at the moment. I've been helping Conor Goodwin recently, trying to get him up to speed. I honestly don't mind it since I have 6 years of programming experience, and I'm happy to share that knowledge. I got impatient trying to work with him on spf0 today, and I figured out why we've been having issues. Turns out, Structured and Object Oriented Problem Solving (CSCS1240) isn't as up to speed as expected. Joe is doing a good job teaching them, and they should have a good understanding of OOP concepts by the end of the semester. The problem is though, that Conor needs to have that knowledge now. By the end of the semester, he would have everything he needs, but right now it's absolutely hurting him to not have that knowledge. It would be nice if I didn't have to teach about arrays and for loops, which should be (and eventually will be this semester) taught in CSCS1240. I will communicate my concerns with the appropriate staff at some point, but this is my initial thoughts/​complaints that relate to the class at the moment.
  
-pct solver shenanigans +===pct solver shenanigans===
-===+
 During the beginning of the semester, I was really frustrated with the pct's. I didn't quite have a hang on how to solve them, so I made a script to solve it for me. It's a pretty simple script which I call my "dark magic",​ which I've actually had multiple seek me out for. I only distributed my code to one person, and I now hope that they don't distribute that further. My original purpose was to make it as a way to check work going through, so you don't have to completely restart over simple errors. I used it on the first pct, but honestly haven'​t used it much since because I understand it now (granted I've slacked on my pct's so that would explain it too). During the beginning of the semester, I was really frustrated with the pct's. I didn't quite have a hang on how to solve them, so I made a script to solve it for me. It's a pretty simple script which I call my "dark magic",​ which I've actually had multiple seek me out for. I only distributed my code to one person, and I now hope that they don't distribute that further. My original purpose was to make it as a way to check work going through, so you don't have to completely restart over simple errors. I used it on the first pct, but honestly haven'​t used it much since because I understand it now (granted I've slacked on my pct's so that would explain it too).
  
 A summary of my code is some stolen code from StackOverflow to generate permutations of all the letters, to which it would add a newline and generate the md5 checksum to compare to the list of existing hashes. If a hash matched, it would print FOUND with the letters and the checksum. It's a pretty neat brute force method. I wrote it in Python, and it works well. Problem is though, I have to copy all the hashes and insert the letters every time I run the program. Well guess what! It's almost like I can use Bash to make a script to read from the files in the public directory! The issue is: I have to translate the permutation code I stole from StackOverflow to Bash in order to make it work. After that, the rest will be easy. I'm still working on that part, but hopefully I can make it work soon. It's a handy tool to have, and I hope I can use it to help others understand how the pct's work. A summary of my code is some stolen code from StackOverflow to generate permutations of all the letters, to which it would add a newline and generate the md5 checksum to compare to the list of existing hashes. If a hash matched, it would print FOUND with the letters and the checksum. It's a pretty neat brute force method. I wrote it in Python, and it works well. Problem is though, I have to copy all the hashes and insert the letters every time I run the program. Well guess what! It's almost like I can use Bash to make a script to read from the files in the public directory! The issue is: I have to translate the permutation code I stole from StackOverflow to Bash in order to make it work. After that, the rest will be easy. I'm still working on that part, but hopefully I can make it work soon. It's a handy tool to have, and I hope I can use it to help others understand how the pct's work.
journal/spring2020/chorton8/week9.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/25 22:53 by chorton8